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The Internationalisation of Japanese Universities

Wednesday 12 May | 16.30 P.M. - 18.00 p.m.

In the global race to attract students and create world class higher educational institutions, Japan has made some real progress - but a great deal more could be done. Our event today will look at policy, practice and performance and see what students, employers, universities and policy makers can develop further.

Location

Online

Price

Members: ¥0

Non Members: ¥2,000

Written by Sam

Note: A Zoom access link will be sent to all participants 2 hours before the webinar is scheduled to start.

In the global race to attract students and create world class higher educational institutions, Japan has made some real progress – but a great deal more could be done. Our event today will look at policy, practice and performance and see what students, employers, universities and policy makers can develop further.

The Japanese government, through MEXT, the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, has a firm commitment to increasing the international competitiveness of Japan’s higher education. And through the G30 programme a lot has been done, with 13 institutions identified as having world class aspirations and a further 24 asked to lead in internationalisation.

But implementation has been patchy. We can find genuine world class institutions, but they exist alongside a number for whom internationalisation is just a means to increase domestic competitiveness; and a number for whom much improvement is needed in implementation.

Part of the problem is the student experience – not just the tuition and academic approach, important though this is. It includes registration, application, scholarships and funding, as well as non-academic aspects of university life such as accommodation and integration into the wider community. There is also the need for university support both during and post-study as well as in the transition to the job market. Again, a range from excellence to poor, with a real need to understand what international students value and need.

The education sector is one the BCCJ has considerable interest in. Both the public sector and our business members see great opportunities to help develop and serve this huge part of Japanese society with the ever-growing expertise the UK has in this area. Join us on 12th May from 16:30-18:00 (JST), when we will delve into how universities in Japan have and continue to internationalise, and hear from our expert panellists their thoughts on what more can be done.

Speakers

Kuni Sato  | Director of the Office for International Planning at MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Science)

Mr. SATO, Chief Director for University Reform and Director of Office for International planning, Higher Education Bureau, Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan, has over 20 years of experiences in higher education policy development, especially in the development of a variety of internationalization initiatives of Japan, such as Top Global University Project, Inter-University Exchange Project and formulation of Joint Degree Guideline. In addition, he has dedicated to harmonization process in higher education especially with other Asian countries through various initiatives such as CAMPUS Asia Project, AIMS Program, and UNESCO Tokyo Convention. M.A. in Education, the University of Tokyo.

Mr. SATO, Chief Director for University Reform and Director of Office for International planning, Higher Education Bureau, Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan, has over 20 years of experiences in higher education policy development, especially in the development of a variety of internationalization initiatives of Japan, such as Top Global University Project, Inter-University Exchange Project and formulation of Joint Degree Guideline. In addition, he has dedicated to harmonization process in higher education especially with other Asian countries through various initiatives such as CAMPUS Asia Project, AIMS Program, and UNESCO Tokyo Convention. M.A. in Education, the University of Tokyo.

Dr. Misaki Takabayashi | Vice Dean of Graduate School, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology

Dr. Misaki Takabayashi is the Vice Dean/Associate Vice President at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) and overseas academic and student affairs for the PhD program in science, as well as external engagement such as student outreach and alumni engagement. Devoted to student-centered education, she is focused on evolving support for current and future students in an inclusive and equitable environment. With a clear conviction that universities must be an integral part of community, Dr. Takabayashi proactively engages with government and industry partners for creating educational and professional opportunities of students of all ages.

Dr. Takabayashi earned her MSc in Biology at the University of Sydney and PhD in marine studies at the University of Queensland. Prior to taking on her role at OIST, Dr. Takabayashi was a professor of Marine Science and Associate Vice Chancellor at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo.

Dr. Misaki Takabayashi is the Vice Dean/Associate Vice President at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) and overseas academic and student affairs for the PhD program in science, as well as external engagement such as student outreach and alumni engagement. Devoted to student-centered education, she is focused on evolving support for current and future students in an inclusive and equitable environment. With a clear conviction that universities must be an integral part of community, Dr. Takabayashi proactively engages with government and industry partners for creating educational and professional opportunities of students of all ages.

Dr. Takabayashi earned her MSc in Biology at the University of Sydney and PhD in marine studies at the University of Queensland. Prior to taking on her role at OIST, Dr. Takabayashi was a professor of Marine Science and Associate Vice Chancellor at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo.

Professor Suematsu | Special Advisor to President, Tohoku University (leading Tohoku’s Be Global programme)

Professor Kazuko Suematsu is the Special Advisor to the President for International Affairs and the Deputy Director of the Global Learning Center at Tohoku University. She is responsible for developing international strategies for the university, leading various international projects, teaching intercultural education classes at both undergraduate and graduate levels, and overseeing a variety of incoming and outgoing international programs.

As a specialist of intercultural collaborative learning, she is committed to the internationalisation of curriculums and teaching practices, as well as research that looks into outcomes of Internationalisation at Home, and is actively engaged in faculty development at universities both in Japan and globally.  

Professor Kazuko Suematsu is the Special Advisor to the President for International Affairs and the Deputy Director of the Global Learning Center at Tohoku University. She is responsible for developing international strategies for the university, leading various international projects, teaching intercultural education classes at both undergraduate and graduate levels, and overseeing a variety of incoming and outgoing international programs.

As a specialist of intercultural collaborative learning, she is committed to the internationalisation of curriculums and teaching practices, as well as research that looks into outcomes of Internationalisation at Home, and is actively engaged in faculty development at universities both in Japan and globally.  

Prof Peter G R Smith | Pro-Vice Chancellor for International Projects, University of Southampton

In this role Peter leads for the University on Research Networks such as WUN, RENKEI and GFCC.  He leads the Optical Engineering and Quantum Photonics Group at Southampton, comprising 25 researchers, working in the areas of Quantum Technologies, Optical Fabrication, etc.

He holds an EPSRC Established Career Fellowship in Quantum Technologies. Following study in Physics at St John’s College, Oxford he worked in the City of London before joining the Optoelectronics Research Centre at the University of Southampton. He is an active researcher in Optical waveguides and optical fabrication, with particular interests in Quantum Technology, planar Bragg gratings and nonlinear optical materials. Recent work in the area of waveguide quantum optics has led to papers in Science and Nature Comms. The joint work with University of Oxford, and NIST, has been featured in Scientific American, Wired, New Scientist, etc.

In this role Peter leads for the University on Research Networks such as WUN, RENKEI and GFCC.  He leads the Optical Engineering and Quantum Photonics Group at Southampton, comprising 25 researchers, working in the areas of Quantum Technologies, Optical Fabrication, etc.

He holds an EPSRC Established Career Fellowship in Quantum Technologies. Following study in Physics at St John’s College, Oxford he worked in the City of London before joining the Optoelectronics Research Centre at the University of Southampton. He is an active researcher in Optical waveguides and optical fabrication, with particular interests in Quantum Technology, planar Bragg gratings and nonlinear optical materials. Recent work in the area of waveguide quantum optics has led to papers in Science and Nature Comms. The joint work with University of Oxford, and NIST, has been featured in Scientific American, Wired, New Scientist, etc.

Guy Perring | Regional Director, i-graduate Asia

Guy Perring is Regional Director, SE Asia for i-graduate, an independent benchmarking and consultancy, delivering comparative insights for the education sector specializing in internationalisation, improving the student experience and assisting institutions in ensuring their students are achieving their objectives in employment and citizenship. Guy is responsible for spearheading their ASEAN operation. He has worked in education for over 25 years in a variety of roles from teacher to administrator, market researcher to consultant. He previously worked at the British Council for 12 years in a variety of roles, most recently leading a Southeast Asian Regional Transnational Education Project designed to offer support for UK and local institutions in establishing sustainable partnerships. He has presented at a number of international conferences including Going Global, QS-Apple and the Commonwealth of Education Ministers. He is an alumnus of Durham and Manchester Universities.

Guy Perring is Regional Director, SE Asia for i-graduate, an independent benchmarking and consultancy, delivering comparative insights for the education sector specializing in internationalisation, improving the student experience and assisting institutions in ensuring their students are achieving their objectives in employment and citizenship. Guy is responsible for spearheading their ASEAN operation. He has worked in education for over 25 years in a variety of roles from teacher to administrator, market researcher to consultant. He previously worked at the British Council for 12 years in a variety of roles, most recently leading a Southeast Asian Regional Transnational Education Project designed to offer support for UK and local institutions in establishing sustainable partnerships. He has presented at a number of international conferences including Going Global, QS-Apple and the Commonwealth of Education Ministers. He is an alumnus of Durham and Manchester Universities.

Alison Beale | Director, University of Oxford Japan Office / BCCJ Vice President (Moderator)

Alison has been Director of the University of Oxford Japan Office since 2012 after 15 years of living and working in Japan and a career in international and cultural relations. She worked for many years for the British Council in senior positions in China, Trinidad and Tobago and Japan, most recently as Deputy Director Japan from 2009–2012. She is frequently asked to talk about Higher Education and to advise universities in Japan on their internationalisation strategies. 

Alison has been Director of the University of Oxford Japan Office since 2012 after 15 years of living and working in Japan and a career in international and cultural relations. She worked for many years for the British Council in senior positions in China, Trinidad and Tobago and Japan, most recently as Deputy Director Japan from 2009–2012. She is frequently asked to talk about Higher Education and to advise universities in Japan on their internationalisation strategies.